More Bonnet Styles

These are not bonnets I have made, but I will try to describe them for you.

Ohio Amish bonnet

A traditional Amish bonnet, the sort a young woman gets at her baptism. The brim is stiff and shaped. Shellacked bonnet board (heavy cardstock) was used in the past, but flexible plastics and plastic mesh are used now.

Old Order Amish bonnetSame Old Order Amish bonnet, side

This bonnet was described as an Amish slat bonnet, but I think the owner was mistaken, and it is just a stiff-brimmed bonnet, again of the typical “outing” bonnet style worn by Old Order Amish women in different districts.

Lancaster Amish sunbonnet

 The collector called this a Lancaster Amish sunbonnet, and described it as vintage. It has a vintage look to the fabric and what I can make of the stitching. Quite possibly it was a homesewn sunbonnet for field work, saving the outing bonnet for “nice.”

Black slat bonnet

I would think this slat bonnet was machine sewn and not old. It was described as Amish or Quaker; I’m thinking it is a recently made bonnet for the re-enactor’s market. A slat bonnet has slim pieces of ash splint or heavy cardboard sewn into the pockets on the brim. It lies flat when not in use, so it can be put in a drawer rather than requiring a peg or shelf space. The long cape in the back covers the neck and upper shoulders, and has a tie in the back ot sort of pleat the excess fabric together. The brim hides the whole face. I wear one working outdoors as I am very allergic to sunscreens. One of the reasons I think this is for a more sophisticated buyer than the average farm woman is that it is in black, which is too hot to wear in the field. A friend made a beautiful slat bonnet in dark wool that I think would be perfect for someone who walks a lot in winter, rather “Jane Eyre”-esque.

Amish-made child's sunbonnet

 A child’s sunbonnet found at an Amish auction, I would hazard that this is made from a man’s shirt or even a remnant bought at an “Englisch” (non-Amish) shop. I’m dating it from the forties or fifties. A windowpane check is a bit wild for most Amish households.

flour sack slat bonnet

 The collector who posted this photo thought it a strange shape for a bonnet. Well, it is, because she has it the wrong way round. The neck ruffle is at the front, the slats facing down. She called it a flour sack bonnet. Cotton flour sacks were produced in chintzes, florals, and other  patterns for the farmwife to turn into aprons and bonnets and even children’s dresses.

Amish women in Lancaster, vintage postcard

A vitnage postcard from Lancaster County, Pernnsylvania, shows three Amish matrons chatting on the street. The bonnets look to be more of the field style rather than the more formal and stiffer outing bonnet one would wear to church.

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