I’m Back

We finally have an internet connection I was stubborn and shopped around for the best deal, but had to go with a satellite connection. We are in the river valley and it was hard to get line of sight. I’ve got plenty to write about concerning our new year of homesteading.

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16 thoughts on “I’m Back

  1. So glad you are back on! How we have missed you, dear! I know I am eager to read what your journey was like and has been thus far at the new homestead!

  2. I began to wonder if you were ever coming back!! I have not even met you and I found myself downright concerned about you and little ideas wafted through my head now and then, scenarios of what might have happened. I am glad you are ok and back and am anxious to hear about what is surely one of your most interesting months in a long while.
    Joanie

  3. Anna – I have been reading your blog for a while and just tried to access it, but I have to be invited now it says. I didn’t see a way to ask you for permission to read your blog. Hope you don’t mind me asking here, Magdalena. If you would like more info on who I am just let me know to do that.

    Thanks!
    Joanie Wilson

  4. I hope your move was successful and your holidays were happy ones.
    Glad to have you back and am ready to ready what the experiences are that you are having.

  5. I agree with them! ^^^^^

    I just found this site recently, and was afraid that I had missed the boat by just a little bit, as I’ve visited many blogs that suddenly end, with no entries at all after the last one. “Missing the boat” is not just a figure of speech for me, as I literally did miss the boat once–actually the ferry to Martha’s Vineyard. In that case, I just had to wait a few hours for the next ferry out to the island, and I was hoping that it was the same situation here: that if I was patient and waited for a while, someone would show up.

    I’ve had my share of relocation woes, so I quite understand why there were no posts for a few weeks, especially since these days you have to worry about a new internet connection every time you move.

    I

  6. Please dont wear amish style clothing. Its so annoying. Just wear a regular scarf, be modest and cover but dont try to appropriate someone else’s traditions. Im not trying to be mean, its just so common of seekers these days and more revealing of a “romanticism” of Amish/Mennonite/Brethren life more than anything else. That style of dress is meant to be worn in community only. It has no relevance whatsoever outside of a community structure. “Plainess” is not biblical, modesty is. Plain communities continue traditional garb to keep ties to the past and to maintain a uniformity.

    • I can’t say I’m sorry you are annoyed, as it is rather an amusing statement. What annoys you about it? I am Quaker Plain, rather than Amish Plain. The Amish, in settling in Pennsylvania, adopted Quaker styles of dress then prevalent as more practical than their own native costume. Many conservative Quakers continue this practice. We don’t have an ordnung, so can adapt it to suit our life needs. Have a look at Quaker Jane’s webpage, for instance. As for living in community – although we are scattered far and wide due to modern life, most of us who fall into the “Anglican” Plain category (in which I include the chucrhes and groups that were once part of the Anglican family – Quaker, Methodist, and Pentecostal) consider ourselves in community with each other. I keep the prayer cap, the plain dress, the apron, boots, shawl and sober black coat as traditional to my faith practice.

      As for those in other faith groups who have on their own adopted Amish style dress out of romantic reasons because they have been to Lancaster and read some books by Wanda Brunstetter – well, most of them are young and such are the excesses of youth! I don’t mind; if it is not their calling to do this, then they will give it up when they yearn for a bit of lace on a dress or decide that the charity veil is more becoming. Worse things can befall a young woman than this!

      And as the Orthodox say in fasting season – keep thy eyes on thy own plate!

      God bless thee; thee is, perhaps, under a convincement. Seek discernment.

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